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Home > News > Training > ProPilot's KSA course aims to revolutionise pilot training

ProPilot’s KSA course aims to revolutionise pilot training

_DSC1128ProPilot attended the Professional Flight Training Exhibition at LHRon 12 April, and was sharing big news about its new KSA course, developed in partnership with airlines and described as an ‘upgrade’ for its current ATPL course. The KSA (Knowledge, Skills, Attitude) upgrade has been developed as a result of statistics from a number of airlines that suggest that pilots aren’t able to cut it in terms of knowledge and how to apply it in the full context of flying an airliner. The training, the only course of its kind, aims to bring all the modules together in one cohesive package. The course has had input from airlines and IAAPS (International Association of Aviation Personnel Schools) and is already being described as a ‘gamechanger’.

ProPilot’s CTKI Jaqui Suren, explains, “This training has been created to result in pilots’ skills that the airlines require. At the moment, the information we have from airlines is that this level of all-round understanding just isn’t there. Many cadets at the moment are passing exams, because they know the question bank, but airlines can see the difference between candidates who have just enough knowledge to pass, and those who have a comprehensive, basic understanding, with fundamental knowledge underpinning their training.”

As for the question of why this type of training hasn’t been developed before, Jaqui explains, “Historically, ground training has been squeezed financially, and perhaps also regarded as a hoop to jump through. It’s also an area of training that’s more resistant to change, with the individuals involved perhaps being a little older, with little drive to review the system. However, this new system, based on airlines’ needs, is groundbreaking and will thoroughly change the way we train pilots.”

ProPilot’s philosophy is supported by ICAO, which has in the past flagged up problems with current ATPL exams, stating, ‘It is probable that the majority of current airline transport pilot knowledge exams (used by NAAs today) fail to validate the necessary knowledge competencies to proceed with indoctrination to an international air operator.’ (ICAO Doc 9956 p.42)

Cadet Laurence Hardisty, 27, (pictured) is currently undertaking a full-time ATPL course with Aeros and ProPilot at Coventry Airport. Laurence explained why the KSA training has been beneficial for him. “The best way to describe is that it’s brought everything together, combining all the theory, knowledge, protocol, etiquette and it’s put it all into context. We’ve also been working with current pilots who fly for major UK airlines, who have been sharing their experience. This has been a major benefit for me. It definitely gives me a great advantage going into the next stage of my training.”

ProPilot will be hosting an Open Day on 26 April at Coventry. For more, visit www.propilot.eu.